Orla-Jo's Not Dead

Travels, Tales and the stuff in between

18,475 notes

slaughterhouse-420:

oystergirlrhymes:

This semester I went to the White Privilege Conference in Madison, WI for my honors seminar about examining privilege. I made a poster about the behaviors of particular white female musicians who appropriate other cultures as a means of identity and sexualize/objectify WOC as a means of displaying sexual agency and social power. All under the guise of “empowerment”.


This is my take on the knowledge I found through seminar and readings, (esp. online articles) so in no way do I claim these ideas or concepts as my own.

wow very informative and well said!! 

(via psyykkinen-lintukoto)

Filed under cultural appropriation race culture

345,331 notes

chesireclam:

arcanacat:

allthingshyper:

smallworldofbigal:

ashleymater:

Tippi Benjamine Okanti Degré, daughter of French wildlife photographers Alain Degré and Sylvie Robert, was born in Namibia. During her childhood she befriended many wild animals, including a 28-year old elephant called Abu and a leopard nicknamed J&B. She was embraced by the Bushmen and the Himba tribespeople of the Kalahari, who taught her how to survive on roots and berries, as well as how to speak their language.

Learn more

in before tumblr screams about cultural appropiation

This doesn’t even count as cultural appropriation

This isn’t a person robbing a culture, to hell with the others

This is a child born right next to that culture

Who was embraced by the people and taught how to do some of the things they do

Which is not the same as cultural appropriation

No cultural appropriation. Just something really beautiful.

I love the picture where she’s cuddling a frog.

Are frogs a culture?

(via killjoyfeminist)

17,036 notes

roachpatrol:

elementalsight:

gardnerhill:

madlori:

This scene was actually when I went from feeling more or less neutral on Joan to actively disliking her.

Because wow, that was patronizing.

I loved that scene in Elementary.

1) Firstly, because it immediately deconstructs the “hero throws and breaks something in frustration” cliche (Sherlock throwing a glass slide in HoB, anyone?) it might even be seen as a parody of that cliche.

2) Secondly, because the dynamic is different between a man and a woman than it would be between two women or two men, the visual of a man smashing something in a temper in front of a woman can be taken as threatening or borderline abusive. Joan Watson immediately shows that she is not intimidated by Holmes’ behavior.

3) Lastly? One of the running themes of Elementary is the deconstruction of Sherlock Holmes as the solitary, antisocial genius, and his becoming a member of a community. Holmes’ gifts are given their due respect, but no one in Elementary plays the game of Because Sherlock Holmes is a Bloody Genius He Can Do Whatever He Wants So There. When Sherlock goes after Moriarty (“M”), Captain Gregson suspends him. When Sherlock doesn’t want to talk about his addiction, Alfredo says “You’ve got to get over yourself.” And when Sherlock behaves like a spoiled child, Joan tells him “Use your words.”

You see Joan patronizing Sherlock. I see a member of Sherlock’s community teaching him how to behave like an adult member of that community.

Additionally, Watson’s done good work for a number of years as a sober companion, not a manchild enabler. It’s quite literally her job to deconstruct people’s shitty self-defeating habits and demonstrate that there are better ways to live your life. She’s not in the business of humoring anyone or playing along with their tantrums, she’s in the business of fixing them. And what she does works! It gets spelled out explicitely in the text of the show: Sherlock himself admits that what’s changed about him, for the better, is her. 

(Source: elementarymydearworld, via flameintobeing)

Filed under Joan Watson Sherlock Holmes Elementary

84 notes

marinashutup:

themiragechild:

marinashutup:

merrywise:

Great work. Way to discredit all of Jaime Lannister’s well-earned character development, HBO. 

and make a scene a lot rape-ier than it was written in the books for no apparent reason and most likely refuse to give it the proper respect/storyline/attention

The director said he tried very hard to make the scene look consensual, and he thought he succeeded. I haven’t seen the scene but I think we have to say it’s the result of shitty directing and shitty editing, unless it suddenly becomes important to the plot of the TV show, in which case, fuck off D&D.

whoever framed the scene that way (whether it be the fault of the director or whoever was in charge of editing) clearly has some fucked up views about what constitutes consent and rape

Filed under tw: rape Game of Thrones

81,875 notes

These days, before we talk about misogyny, women are increasingly being asked to modify our language so we don’t hurt men’s feelings. Don’t say, “Men oppress women” – that’s sexism, as bad as any sexism women ever have to handle, possibly worse. Instead, say, “Some men oppress women.” Whatever you do, don’t generalise. That’s something men do. Not all men – just some men.

This type of semantic squabbling is a very effective way of getting women to shut up. After all, most of us grew up learning that being a good girl was all about putting other people’s feelings ahead of our own. We aren’t supposed to say what we think if there’s a chance it might upset somebody else or, worse, make them angry. So we stifle our speech with apologies, caveats and soothing sounds. We reassure our friends and loved ones that “you’re not one of those men who hate women”.

What we don’t say is: of course not all men hate women. But culture hates women, so men who grow up in a sexist culture have a tendency to do and say sexist things, often without meaning to. We aren’t judging you for who you are but that doesn’t mean we’re not asking you to change your behaviour. What you feel about women in your heart is of less immediate importance than how you treat them on a daily basis.

You can be the gentlest, sweetest man in the world yet still benefit from sexism. That’s how oppression works.
Of course all men don’t hate women. But all men must know they benefit from sexism  (via albinwonderland)

(via killjoyfeminist)

Filed under women feminism sexism